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Effects of Dietary Phytocompounds in a guinea pig model of paw edema
Puneet Gupta, Neelam Singh, Nidhi Tyagi, Pallavi Mittal, Smriti Sahu

Abstract
Background: Grape seed powder (GSP) and Green tea powder (GTP) are the two popular natural sources that have the potential to attenuate inflammation. The development of natural therapeutic agents for inflammation associated disorders will reduce conventional chemicals. Objective: The present study was designed to determine if a diet enriched with GSP and GTP would alter the carrageenan-induced paw edema in the guinea pig model. Method: Diets containing varying amounts of GSP (250mg-500 mg/kg BW) and GTP (250 mg-500 mg/kg BW) were prepared. The carrageenan-induced Dunkin Hartley guinea pig paw edema model was used to study the effect of GSP and GTP on acute inflammation. Animal groups fed a standard diet supplemented with low (250 mg/kg/day× 14 days) and high dose (500 mg/kg/day× 14 days) of GSP and GTP for two weeks. On day 15, edema was induced; paw volume and percentage inhibition rate of edema was calculated. Afterward, Prostaglandin E2 was estimated in the serum of control and inflamed guinea pig. Results: In multiple comparisons between GSP and GTP, at dose of 250mg/kg both gives insignificance (p>0.05) difference in edema paw volume. Although, GSP and GTP showed a significant difference (p=0.01) in edema paw volume at a higher dose of 500mg/kg. GSP produced a significantly greater decrease in PEG2 level than GTP in a dosedependent manner. At dose 250 mg/kg GSP and GTP did not show a significant difference in PGE2 level (p>0.05) while at dose 500 mg/kg both phytocompounds showed significant difference (p=0.01). Conclusion: The results indicate that a diet enriched with phytocompounds showed increased percentage inhibition of paw edema in a dose-dependent manner on carrageenaninduced paw edema in guinea pig. GSP and GTP showed dose-dependent inhibitory activity on PGE2 production in the serum of inflamed guinea pigs.

Keywords: Edema, dose dependent, phytocompounds, carrageenan